How to Reduce Lawn Burn Caused by Your Dog

If you’re a dog owner you know well that caring for a dog is like caring for a small child who stays a small child for their entire life. They’re a lot of work, but dogs are a part of the family and anyone lucky enough to have a canine companion will tell you that they’re more than worth the trouble.

One difficulty many dog owners face is burn spots on their lawns. Most people assume that dogs are going to kill their grass one way or another and it’s useless to try to prevent it. However, with some diligence and training you can prevent dead spots from taking over your lawn.

What is lawn burn?

Dog urine is very high in nitrogen. While a little bit of nitrogen is healthy for your soil and your grass, too much makes the soil extremely acidic which kills your lawn causing “burn” spots.

If you’ve ever gardened before you might be familiar with the concept of soil’s pH number. A pH number describes how acidic (0-6) or how basic (7-14) a substance is. Different types of plant life require different levels of acidity on the pH scale.

When you buy fertilizer or plant food at the garden shop you’re really buying a mixture of chemicals that alter your soil’s pH. The ideal pH for growing healthy grass is 6.5-7, roughly midway on the pH scale.

What can be done?

Ok, so now you know the science behind why your dog doing his business kills your lawn. But what can you do about it?

There are a number of different techniques that have been proven to be effective at mitigating or eliminating the damage caused by lawn burn.

  • Training. The most effective methods of preventing lawn burn is through proper training of your dog. Find a part of your yard that you ideally want to train your dog to do their business in. This part can be dirt, rocks, or an out of sight patch of lawn that you don’t mind taking some damage. Lead them over to this area when it’s time for them to go out and give them treats and verbal praise when they do their business in that area. If they start to urinate in another area, correct them by calling them over to the area they should be in. Don’t punish them, as this will confuse dogs and they might not feel safe urinating outside at all.
  • Water down. An effective method of preventing burn spots is to simply saturate the area where the dog urinated with water immediately afterward. This will dilute the nitrogen from the urine and limit damage.
  • Healthy nutrition. Dog food is sometimes very high in protein which increases nitrogen in their urine. Pick a food that has healthy amounts of protein in it. Similarly, dehydrated dogs will have urine with a higher nitrogen level. Encourage your dog to drink plenty of water.

Myths about lawn burn

Many myths about dog-related lawn burn have appeared over the years. Some people argue that female dogs’ urine burns a lawn more than males. This is untrue. If a female dog’s urine does burn the lawn more it is simply because female dogs have a tendency to stay in one place while doing their business.

Other myths include the usefulness of feeding your dog supplements to eliminate spots or that certain dog breeds have more acidic urine and cause more spotting. These are also misconceptions.

The best options are to work together with your dog and make sure they are well-fed and hydrated. Soon your lawn will regrow to its former glory.

Fast Action is a Key to Finding Lost Pets

The realization that a family dog or cat has gone missing can be a scary, if not panic-inducing moment. While some cats seem able to fend for themselves in the outside world, if they’re gone for more than a day, it’s only natural to assume the worst. It goes without saying that cats kept indoors stand the best chance of staying safe and living a long life. However, many cats are determined to explore the outside world regardless of your good intentions, and trying to prevent them from doing so may ultimately be an exercise in futility. To further complicate matters, many cats and dogs are quite resourceful when it comes to spotting and taking advantage of open doors and unlocked backyard gates.

Once they’re outside, cats can easily jump over fences, and dogs — especially puppies — have a knack for finding and escaping through small openings in the fence (often at the bottom) that you may not have noticed. There are a lot of different possible causes for the disappearance of a pet, but the sense of loss families experience when a beloved pet doesn’t return is universal. Since prevention only goes so far with adventurous cats and dogs, it can also be helpful to have a quick response plan ready. Making sure your pet is either micro-chipped or wearing a collar with up-to-date ID tags can increase your chances of getting a lost pet returned to you quickly.

One vital resource to be aware of and connected with is neighborhood social media sites. By finding out if there are any active ones in your area, you can be in a better position to quickly alert your neighbors, in the event your pet suddenly disappears. Since many people are pet owners, they’ll be very sympathetic and responsive to an online post of a missing dog or cat. The bottom line is this: Your prospects of a speedy reunion will often improve in direct proportion to how many neighbors know about your missing animal friend and how to contact you.

There’s also the relatively old-fashioned, but often effective method of printing out and posting “lost pet” flyers. In addition to posting them in various locations, such as dog parks, neighborhood stores, and pet-oriented businesses, you can also hand them out to neighbors you see when conducting your initial search. For maximum effectiveness, the flyer should say “Lost Cat” or “Lost Dog” at the top of the flyer, and include a good photo of your pet, as well as your phone number and information about when and where they were last seen. Other features, such as breed, color, markings, age, weight, gender, your pet’s name, and any unique characteristics should also be included in the flyer to help neighbors identify your pet. Additional tactics and tools for recovering a lost pet are also available through the ASPCA.

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Date: 08/13/2017 Time: 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM  
For Directions: feel free to contact me.  
For more information: click here for the full details  

Completely renovated Open Floor Plan- (3) Bedroom, (2) Bath, (1) Car Garage, Split Entry home on a 1.24 acres lot located on a dead end street. New Kitchen that includes Custom Cabinets with soft close drawers, Granite counter tops, butchers block island and NEW Stainless Steel Appliances that flows into the dining and living room. Hardwood throughout the main level. Custom book shelves in the family room, ¾ bath, separate laundry room, mud room and cedar closet on the lower level. Custom tile work in both bathrooms, Whole House Generator, Irrigation, Air Conditioning, this home has it all. Don’t wait to see this one, there is still time to enjoy the large deck overlooking your level fenced in yard this summer!!!